Tuesday, September 27, 2016

SJ Special Issue -- Call for Papers (January 15, 2017)

CALL FOR PAPERS
                                                                       
Special Issue of Social Justice on Punishment & History
Issue editor: Ashley Rubin (ashley.rubin@utoronto.ca)
Deadline: January 15, 2017


Periods of penal transition often encourage historical reflection, whether to understand the present situation of crisis and/or change, or to learn from past strategies and mistakes. As conversations about mass incarceration in the United States increasingly revolve around change, and societies around the world face distinctive sets of challenges in the field of punishment and social control, historical interrogations of punishment may be especially relevant.
This special issue of Social Justice on the topic of punishment and history will interrogate the role of history in the study of punishment, illuminating its utility and limitations for understanding penal change. In particular, we aim to identify the utility of historical examinations of punishment for understanding the current constellation of inequalities, (dis)empowerment, and suffering wrought by contemporary criminal justice policy and practice. Thus, rather than seeking the historical origins of mass incarceration, this issue examines how penal history, broadly intended, might provide lessons for understanding punishment as a social institution and its consequences for society, especially society’s most vulnerable members.
The issue will try to answer the following questions: What is the role of history in interdisciplinary, especially sociological or sociolegal, studies of punishment? What lessons do historical instances of punishment reveal for the current penal climate and current penal practices? How do conceptions of what constitutes punishment, or what punishment should accomplish, change across time and space? How do our own understandings of punishment shift when we examine these other conceptions? How does punishment’s impact on inequalities across class, race, gender, and sexuality change (or persist) in different temporal-spatial contexts?
This issue will rely on broad conceptions of punishment and history. Scholars are invited to examine some element or type of punishment, including policing and quasi-punishments (such as those imposed upon immigrants, welfare recipients, and others), whether imposed officially or unofficially, by state or non-state actors. There is no restriction on the time period examined, provided that some period before 2000 receives significant attention within the manuscript. Papers may be fully historical (e.g., examining only a past period with little relation to current practices) or more genealogical (e.g., discussing the relevance of past events to the present situation). Additionally, any methodology (qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods) is welcome. Finally, papers may examine any geographical setting (e.g., there is no preference for US or North American settings and no restriction on local, national, or international units of analysis).
Papers should be 7,000 to 8,000 words. Please follow the format guidelines available on the Social Justice website (http://www.socialjusticejournal.org/contact-us/submissions/). Your submission should be emailed to Ashley Rubin at ashley.rubin@utoronto.ca by January 15, 2017.


Sunday, September 25, 2016

Call for LSA panels on big data, risk and technology -- Updated Deadline, 10/1

From Rob Werth:

For the 2017 LSA meetings in Mexico City, we (Kelly Hannah-Moffat, Ben Fleury-Steiner, Paula Maurutto, and Robert Werth) are putting together a series of (2-3) panels for the thematic session Punishment, society and technology: Exploring big data, risk and emerging techniques of crime control.”  We are looking for papers that engage with ongoing debates from a variety of disciplines, including criminology, sociolegal studies, anthropology, law, science and technology studies, and other interdisciplinary fields. We encourage both theoretically engaged submissions and empirically-based work. The panels will be co-sponsored by the Ethnography, Law & Society and Punishment & Society collaborative research networks. The papers included in these panels may be included in a special issue of a journal or edited collection.  If you believe your current project would make a good fit, please send us a title and short abstract (approx. 1 page) by October 1st via email to: Robert Werth at: rwerth@rice.edu .  Below is an outline of the thematic statement for this series of panels, and feel free to email questions to any one of us at:  hannah.moffat@utoronto.ca, p.maurutto@utoronto.ca, bfs@udel.edu, or rwerth@rice.edu

Punishment, society and technology:  Exploring big data, risk and emerging techniques of crime control

Desires to leverage technology and data in the governance of crime and security are increasingly pervasive. “Big data” analytics are contributing to the development of new understandings of risk, surveillance and crime control as well as producing new technologies which are being used by police, courts, prisons, and probation/parole agencies, as well as numerous non-state actors (ranging from halfway houses to credit card fraud departments). The sheer volume of data and advances in technological adaptations is extraordinary, and the ways in which these impact regimes of control remains opaque. Indeed, social scientists have not sufficiently explored, documented and theorized the effects of big data analytics and related technologies on institutions, communities and individuals. This series of panels will explore big data analytics and emergent/shifting technologies – examining their dispersal, operation and interaction with existing techniques, logics, and means for governing crime and security. We anticipate that papers will address some of the following questions: How are emergent big data analytics and rationalities intersecting with and impacting risk, surveillance, policing, punishment, crime prevention, law? Do new techniques, instruments and mechanisms reconfigure public-private partnerships, and are they blurring the boundaries between the two? How do these technologies and analytics affect existing race, class, gender, and other inequalities historically endemic to systems of justice?  How do ‘practitioners’ understand, embrace, alter or subvert such technologies?  How do these technologies constitute the rights of individuals in conflict with the law?  How do activist and advocacy groups perceive, contest, and use big data technologies? 

Due date: October 1st



Friday, September 9, 2016

POSTDOC ALERT! The University of California, Irvine Chancellor's Postdoctoral Fellowship in Criminology, Law & Society

The UCI Chancellor's  Postdoctoral Fellowship Program in Criminology, Law & Society offers postdoctoral research fellowships and faculty mentoring to qualified scholars in the field whose research, teaching, and service will contribute to diversity and equal opportunity. These contributions may include public service addressing the needs of our increasingly diverse society, efforts to advance equitable access to higher education for women and minorities, or research focusing on underserved populations or understanding issues of racial or gender inequalities. This Postdoctoral Fellow is selected from the pool of applicants who identified mentors in the Department of Criminology, Law & Society at UC Irvine and submitted their applications to the University of California President's Postdoctoral Fellowship Program by November 1st at  
http://ppfp.ucop.edu/info/index.html

More information can be accessed here: 
http://cls.soceco.uci.edu/pages/UCI-Chancellors-Postoc-Fellowship-CLS

If you would like to post a fellowship or job listing, please email at punishmentsocietyblog@gmail.com or ashley.rubin@utoronto.ca. 

Sunday, September 4, 2016

Call for LSA panels on big data, risk and technology

Posted c/o Rob Werth:

For the 2017 LSA meetings in Mexico City, we (Kelly Hannah-Moffat, Ben Fleury-Steiner, Paula Maurutto, and Robert Werth) are putting together a series of (2-3) panels for the thematic session “Punishment, society and technology: Exploring big data, risk and emerging techniques of crime control.”  We are looking for papers that engage with ongoing debates from a variety of disciplines, including criminology, sociolegal studies, anthropology, law, science and technology studies, and other interdisciplinary fields. We encourage both theoretically engaged submissions and empirically-based work. The panels will be co-sponsored by the Punishment & Society and Ethnography, Law & Society collaborative research networks. The papers included in these panels may be included in a special issue of a journal or edited collection.  If you believe your current project would make a good fit, please send us a title and short abstract (approx. 1 page) by September 21st via email to: Robert Werth at: rwerth@rice.edu .  Below is an outline of the thematic statement for this series of panels, and email questions to any one of us at:  hannah.moffat@utoronto.ca, p.maurutto@utoronto.ca, bfs@udel.edu, or rwerth@rice.edu

Punishment, society and technology:  Exploring big data, risk and emerging techniques of crime control

Desires to leverage technology and data in the governance of crime and security are increasingly pervasive. “Big data” analytics are contributing to the development of new understandings of risk, surveillance and crime control as well as producing new technologies which are being used by police, courts, prisons, and probation/parole agencies, as well as numerous non-state actors (ranging from halfway houses to credit card fraud departments). The sheer volume of data and advances in technological adaptations is extraordinary, and the ways in which these impact regimes of control remains opaque. Indeed, social scientists have not sufficiently explored, documented and theorized the effects of big data analytics and related technologies on institutions, communities and individuals. This series of panels will explore big data analytics and emergent/shifting technologies – examining their dispersal, operation and interaction with existing techniques, logics, and means for governing crime and security. We anticipate that papers will address some of the following questions: How are emergent big data analytics and rationalities intersecting with and impacting risk, surveillance, policing, punishment, crime prevention, law? Do new techniques, instruments and mechanisms reconfigure public-private partnerships, and are they blurring the boundaries between the two? How do these technologies and analytics affect existing race, class, gender, and other inequalities historically endemic to systems of justice?  How do ‘practitioners’ understand, embrace, alter or subvert such technologies?  How do these technologies constitute the rights of individuals in conflict with the law?  How do activist and advocacy groups perceive, contest, and use big data technologies? 
  

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

New LSI Issue of Interest

Law and Social Inquiry's latest issue contains a symposium on Law and Sexuality, which features  several articles that will be of interest to punishment and society scholars. These include (among others):


Saturday, August 6, 2016

Members' Publication Digest - August 2016 Edition

As compiled by Miltonette Craig:

RECENTLY PUBLISHED WORKS
August 2016

ARTICLES
Cheliotis, Leonidas K., & Sozzo, Máximo. (2016). Introduction: Democratisation and Punishment. Punishment & Society, 18(3), 263-267.

Cheliotis, Leonidas K., & Xenakis, Sappho. (2016). Punishment and Political Systems: State Punitiveness in Post-Dictatorial Greece. Punishment & Society, 18(3), 268-300.

Kaiser, Joshua. (2016). Revealing the Hidden Sentence: How to Add Legitimacy, Purpose, and Transparency to “Collateral” Punishment Policy. Harvard Law & Policy Review, 10(1), 123-184. 

Super, Gail. (2016). Book Review. [Security in the Bubble: Navigating Crime in Urban South Africa by Christine Hentschel (2015).] Punishment & Society. DOI: 10.1177/1462474516659162

Super, Gail. (2016). Punishment and Democracy in South Africa. Punishment & Society, 18(3), 325-345.

Turnbull, Sarah, & Hasselberg, Ines. From Prison to Detention: The Carceral Trajectories of Foreign-National Prisoners in the United Kingdom. Punishment & Society. DOI: 10.1177/1462474516660695

BOOKS/BOOK CHAPTERS/EDITED COLLECTIONS
Bradford, Ben, Jauregui, Bea, Loader, Ian, & Steinberg, Jonny. (Eds.). (2016). The SAGE Handbook of Global Policing. London: SAGE Publications.

Cheliotis, Leonidas K., & Sozzo, Máximo (special issue editors). (2016). Democratisation and Punishment. Punishment & Society, 18(3).

Lynch, Mona, & Verma, Anjuli. (2016). “The Imprisonment Boom of the Late Twentieth Century: Past, Present, and Future.” In John Wooldredge and Paula Smith (Eds.), The Oxford Handbook on Prisons and Imprisonment. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Xenakis, Sappho, & Cheliotis, Leonidas K. (2015). “Anger Management and the Politics of Crime in the Greek Crisis.” In Georgios Karyotis and Roman Gerodimos (Eds.), The Politics of Extreme Austerity: Greece in the Eurozone Crisis. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Xenakis, Sappho, & Cheliotis, Leonidas K. (2016). “Crime and the Crisis: The Politics of Insecurity in Greece.” In A. Placas & D. Doxiadis (Eds.), The Financial Crisis in Greece: Causes and Consequences. New York: Berghahn.

If you would like your recently published book or article to be included in the next digest,

please send your citation information to Miltonette Craig (mocraig@fsu.edu) by September 30.

Friday, July 29, 2016

The Angola Tour at LSA 2016 -- A Followup, Part III

In the last two posts, I offered a general description and an evaluation of our tour of Louisiana State Penitentiary (Angola) back in June. These posts drew on comments prepared by Johann Koehler and Keramet Reiter. Keramet in particular generously put together a brief essay or reflection of that trip that I promptly split up. Now, I want to post her comments in their entirety to maintain the integrity and coherence of her original words. 

--

As a prison scholar, I have been inside prison and jail facilities across the United States and Europe. Sometimes I enter to conduct interviews with prisoners or staff, for research or advocacy; sometimes to assess a new facility or program; other times to take a group of students to educate them about conditions of confinement. I hesitate to use the word "tour" to describe how I enter prison facilities because the phrase has become charged in prison scholarship, where prison tourism is (rightly, I dare say) condemned as a potentially voyeuristic visit to an institution that is transformed into a human zoo by the tourist's gaze. In spite of this critique, I find that I learn something new with each prison I visit, and that the visits create unparalleled opportunities to talk concretely with students, colleagues, and the public about the utter inhumanity that pervades so many prisons, especially in the United States. To me, not every outsider's footfall across a prison threshold constitutes prison tourism.

Nonetheless, there are some prisons that are so famous, so integrated into prison lore, that I do simply want to tour them, to see the reality I have read about. Louisiana State Penitentiary, known colloquially as Angola, is one such prison -- so perpetually infamous that I simply wanted to see it for myself. I had visited other "plantation" prisons in Alabama and Georgia, but none with their own rodeo, cinematized death row, or substantial gift shop. In particular, I had imagined the Angola gift shop for years, because of a strange gift I was given in 2005.

I was working for Human Rights Watch when Hurricane Katrina hit. One of our researchers went to visit Angola, to document the human rights abuses taking place there as New Orleans flooded and prisoners, literally, disappeared. When the researcher returned to the Human Rights Watch offices in New York, she presented me with a gift: a plush little "beanie baby" dog, dressed in black-and-white prison stripes, stamped with the word "Angola." I have kept that odd memento for more than a decade, moving it from office to office, as a reminder of the many contradictions inherent in our prisons, especially the too easy commodification of suffering. As I entered Angola prison, through the gift shop, this summer, I was surprised to see shelves of those same, familiar little puffy prison dogs.

Later, on the tour, I was more surprised by another bunch of dogs. The only building in the entire, swampy facility, which both houses prisoners and has air conditioning, is the barn, bright white atop a sloping green hill at an edge of the property, where the prison's guard dogs are trained. Our tour guide told us that the most trusted prisoners in Angola earn the right to sleep in the air conditioned barn -- without guards -- and manage the dogs. I asked what exactly the dogs are trained to do. The tour guide said "guard the prison." When I had worked at Human Rights Watch, I had written about the use of dogs to attack prisoners and drag them out of their cells. I suspected the Angola dogs did more than "guard the prison." As our tour bus paused, the guide pointed out a single white cross marking a grave at the foot of the hill. A bill-board-style sign labeled the grave: "Ole Red used in music video by Blake Shelton." Here's where I sheepishly admit to loving Blake Shelton's country classic, "Ole Red," about a prisoner, sentenced to life for killing his wife and her lover, who earns the trust of the warden in prison and is given charge of the prison's guard dog. The prisoner trains the red-haired prison hound to sneak out of the prison on late night rendez-vous with a blue-tick hound beyond the prison gates. Next, the prisoner escapes, running "north" while Ole Red runs "south" to his blue-tick love. The refrain is cute: "Now there's red haired blue ticks all in the South. Love got me in here and love got me out." At Angola, Ole Red's grave, obviously in a place of honor, was a stark contrast to the sea of un-labeled white crosses a few hundred yards beyond, and across the road, marking the graves of the hundreds of prisoners who had died and been buried at Angola over decades of the prison's operation. I could barely make out the edge of the cemetery it was so vast. 

At Angola, I felt more like a prison tourist than I ever had before. Maybe it was the commodification of beanie baby dogs and country music videos. Maybe it was being on the school bus that shuttled 25-or-so-of-us around the prison grounds, past housing units and barns and stables and rows of corn. Still, the images of the visit, from prisoners talking with us in the law library, to the prisoners grooming the horses in the stables, to the museum of execution implements, to the white barn full of dogs up on the hill have mingled with snapshots from Dead Man Walking, the Ole Red music video, and the annual prison rodeo, layering a raw lived reality into a cinematic imagination. 

I, and busloads of other prison tourists, were lucky to cross the threshold of the prison in the morning, and ride out again in the afternoon. That vast cemetery insistently reminded us that most of the prison's inhabitants can never hope to be so lucky. I keep remembering the sticky, swampy heat that wore me out even as I sat still on the old school bus, and I keep imagining living an entire life in that heat with no hope of any relief, whether in the form of a fan, cool air, ice, or freedom. I'm still not sure whether joining the daily exodus of tourists from Angola raises awareness of the contradictions riddling the commodified, imagined reality of prison life, or just re-legitimizes the institution.