Members' Profile Page


Mina Barahimi is a PhD candidate in the Jurisprudence and Social Policy Program at the University of California, Berkeley School of Law. Her research interests lie largely at the intersection of law and immigrant control, with a focus on issues such as citizenship and race; immigrant/non-citizen rights; the criminal management of immigrants (crimmigration); and deportation. In particular, she is interested in examining these issues in the US-Mexico context, and in comparative perspective with the European Union. Relying on multiple methods, including in-depth interviews, her dissertation research examines (1) how immigration enforcement officers engage in the policing of undocumented Mexican immigrants in the US-Mexico borderlands through the discretionary exercise of a summary (i.e. no court hearing) expulsion practice called administrative voluntary departure, and (2) the consequences of this practice for border communities—citizens and noncitizens alike. Voluntary departure is not legally constructed as deportation (or “removal,” as it is known in legal terms), but her research demonstrates that it functions much like deportation. More broadly, her dissertation makes the case that a richer understanding of the scope of the US deportation regime and its effects requires more expansive and critical empirical examination of what constitutes deportation and what it means to be deported.    
Email: mina.barahimi@berkeley.edu

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Vanessa Barker is Docent and Associate Professor of Sociology at Stockholm University.  She has published on democracy and punishment, democracy and deportation, and the welfare state and comparative penal sanctioning.  She is the author of The Politics of Punishment: How the Democratic Process Shapes the Way America Punishes Offenders (Oxford University Press, 2009) and working on a new book about global mobility and penal order. She is a Book Review Editor (Europe/Australia/Asia) for Punishment & Society (http://pun.sagepub.com/). She is part of several research networks, including Border Criminologies (http://bordercriminologies.law.ox.ac.uk/), CRN Punishment & Social Control http://punishmentandsocialcontrol.weebly.com/crn.html, European Working Group on Prison, Detention and Punishment, and Border Crossing Observatory (http://artsonline.monash.edu.au/thebordercrossingobservatory/). She is a former and founding Board Member of Project 180, a prisoner reentry organization based in Sarasota, Florida. (http://www.project180reentry.org/index.html)
Email: vanessa.barker@sociology.su.se


PictureRabia Belt is a JD/PhD student at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor and a Research Academic Fellow at Georgetown University Law Center. Her research interests include citizenship and democracy, legal history, disability, criminal law, and race and the law. She is the author of "'And Then Comes Life': The Intersection of Race, Poverty, and Disability in HBO's The Wire" published in Rutgers Race & The Law Review. Her current research investigates the impact of ideas about mental disability and mental capacity on the development of voting rights over the long 19th century.
Email: belt@umich.edu


Dr. Dale Ballucci's research interests broadly include the administration of the criminal justice system, criminology, policing, socio-legal studies, sociology of childhood, and theories of governance. To date, her research includes examining the role of risk assessment tools in the management of young offenders in custody facilities. Her research also examines the decision-making process in unaccompanied refugee child applications through the analysis of case files.  She is currently working on several projects related to police responses. Building on her previous research she is currently working on a national study that examines how police respond to sex offenders and high volume offenders, particularly those deemed prolific and priority. Second, she is the co-investigator on SSHRC project that investigates police responses to Intimate Partner Violence (IPV). This focus of this research is to understand how police respond to Intimate Partner Violence (IPV). Lastly, she is also a co-investigator on a newly granted SSHRC project that examines the policing of Child and Youth Sexual Victimization in Canada. Her research topics are diverse but her primary focus is investigating the operations of legal practice, and the administration of criminal justice for vulnerable groups such as children and youth. Dr. Dale Ballucci's research interests broadly include the administration of the criminal justice system, criminology, policing, socio-legal studies, sociology of childhood, and theories of governance. To date, her research includes examining the role of risk assessment tools in the management of young offenders in custody facilities. Her research also examines the decision-making process in unaccompanied refugee child applications through the analysis of case files. She is currently working on several projects related to police responses. Building on her previous research she is currently working on a national study that examines how police respond to sex offenders and high volume offenders, particularly those deemed prolific and priority. Second, she is the co-investigator on SSHRC project that investigates police responses to Intimate Partner Violence (IPV). This focus of this research is to understand how police respond to Intimate Partner Violence (IPV). Lastly, she is also a co-investigator on a newly granted SSHRC project that examines the policing of Child and Youth Sexual Victimization in Canada. Her research topics are diverse but her primary focus is investigating the operations of legal practice, and the administration of criminal justice for vulnerable groups such as children and youth.



Jay Borchert is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Sociology, a Rackham Merit Fellow, and a Population Studies Center Trainee at the University of Michigan, a Visiting Scholar at the Center for the Study of Law & Society at UC Berkeley School of Law as well as a 2015-2016 Mellon American Council of Learned Societies Fellow for his dissertation titled “Mass Incarceration, The Profession of Corrections, and the Way Prison Workers Construct Meanings about their Participation in our Punishment State.”  He is the 2015 Best Graduate Student Paper Award Winner for the American Sociological Association’s Section on Sexualities, as well as the 2015 Best Graduate Student Paper Award Honorable Mention Recipient from the Society for the Study of Social Problems Division on Crime and Juvenile Delinquency for his paper titled “A New Iron Closet: Failing to Extend the Spirit of Lawrence vs. Texas to Prisons and Prisoners” forthcoming in The War on Sex. D. Halperin and T. Hoppe (Eds). Duke University Press. Jay’s research examines human rights and macro-level inequality with a sharp focus on prisons and prisoners as objects of both legal and social negotiation and conflict. In the summer of 2016, Jay will be entering prisons in Kentucky in order to examine the culture of prison workers as the labor power required to make mass or hyper-incarceration efficient.  What does it mean to do this work? What kind of consciousness is required to motivate prison work considering the racial and economic characteristics of prisoners? He received his BA in Sociology from DePaul University in 2010 and his MA in Sociology from the University of Michigan in 2012. In addition, Jay is the current Chair of the Society for the Study of Social Problem’s Division on Law and Society. Last but not least, Jay’s work is driven by years of experience living in neighborhoods under high surveillance and police violence, in Los Angeles and Chicago, as well as his 7 years spent as a prisoner in California, Minnesota and Illinois. For some of Jay’s personal prison story, you can watch his appearance on “Life of the Law” titled “Hangin by the Telephone”, here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TqsDHKuQ46o.


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Michelle Brown is associate professor of sociology and division head of law & culture for the Center for the Study of Social Justice at the University of Tennessee.  Her research explores the role of culture, affect, and emotion in the lived life of carceral regimes; forms of premature and slow death and dying in US criminal justice; disparate penal formations in global neoliberal contexts; and emergent forms of political organizing and resistance in response to mass incarceration.  She is the author of The Culture of Punishment (NYUP, 2009), co-author of Criminology Goes to the Movies (with Nicole Rafter; NYUP, 2011), and co-editor of Media Representations of September 11 (Praeger, 2003). She is currently co-editing the Sage journal Crime Media Culture, The Routledge International Handbook of Visual Criminology, and the Palgrave MacMillan Crime, Media  and Culture Book Series.  Her recent work includes the following publications: “Visual Criminology and Carceral Studies,” Theoretical Criminology 18(2);  “Of Prisons, Gardens, and the Way Out,” Studies in Law, Politics, and Society; and “Which  Question? Which Lie?” Reflections on Payne v. Tennessee and the “Quick Glimpse” of Life” in The Punitive Imagination: Law, Justice and Responsibility.  She is currently working on a book, provisionally titled Mourning Becomes Justice: American criminal justice as forms of social life and death.
Email: mbrow121@utk.edu

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Brett C. Burkhardt is an Assistant Professor of Sociology in the School of Public Policy at Oregon State University. He is currently conducting research on the use of private prisons in the United States and has previously written on topics including felon voting rights policies, labor market consequences of felony convictions, and policing. His work has been published in Law & Social Inquiry, Race and Justice, Criminal Justice Policy Review, and Sociological Focus, among others. He teaches courses on law and society, crime policy, criminology, and research methods. He holds a B.A. in sociology from Linfield College and an M.A. and Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is an active member of the American Sociological Association, the Law & Society Association, and the American Society of Criminology.
Email: brett.burkhardt@oregonstate.edu

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Leonidas Cheliotis is an Assistant Professor of Criminology at the Department of Social Policy, London School of Economics and Political Science. Leonidas' main research interests, theoretical as well as empirical, can be grouped under two broad headings: first, the political economy and social psychology of punishment; and second, the implementation and consequences of penal and cognate policies. Jurisdictionally, the focus of his work to date has been on the Anglo-American world and the Mediterranean region from both national and international comparative angles. Methodologically, his research brings together theoretical concepts and insights from a variety of fields, especially from sociology, anthropology, psychology and history, also fusing them with findings from fieldwork he has undertaken in criminal justice settings. Leonidas has received various awards for his research, including the 2015 Outstanding Critical Criminal Justice Scholar Award by the Critical Criminal Justice Section of the American Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, and the 2013 Critical Criminologist of the Year Award by the Division on Critical Criminology of the American Society of Criminology. In 2014, his guest-edited special issue of the South Atlantic Quarterly on 'Prison Realities: Views from Around the World' won the Best Public Intellectual Special Issue Award of the American Council of Editors of Learned Journals, Modern Language Association. Leonidas is an Editor and Book Review Editor of the British Journal of Criminology. In addition, he currently sits on the International Associate Editorial Board of Punishment & Society, the editorial board of the European Journal of Criminology, and the editorial advisory boards of Social Justice: A Journal of Crime, Conflict & World Order and the Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice. Further information about Leonidas and his research can be found here: www.lcheliotis.net
Email: L.Cheliotis@ed.ac.uk 


Todd R. Clear is Distinguished Professor and Provost, Rutgers University-Newark. He has also held professorships at Ball State University, Rutgers University, Florida State University and John Jay College of Criminal Justice. Clear has authored 15 books and over 100 articles and book chapters. His most recent book is The Punishment Imperative by NYU Press (October 2013). Clear has also written on correctional classification, prediction methods in correctional programming, community-based correctional methods, intermediate sanctions, and sentencing policy. He was the founding editor of the journal Criminology & Public Policy, published by the American Society of Criminology. Clear has served as president of The American Society of Criminology, The Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, and The Association of Doctoral Programs in Criminology and Criminal Justice. His work has been recognized through several awards, including those of the American Society of Criminology, the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, The Rockefeller School of Public Policy, the American Probation and Parole Association, the American Correctional Association, and the International Community Corrections Association. He is a Fellow of the American Society of Criminology.
Email: todd.clear@rutgers.edu

Alessandro Corda is Post-Doctoral Research Fellow in Comparative and Cross-National Justice System Studies at the University of Minnesota Law School, where he is affiliated to the Robina Institute of Criminal Law and Criminal Justice, and the Institute on Crime and Public Policy. He received his JD and PhD in Criminal Law and Criminal Justice from the University of Pavia, Italy, and his LLM from New York University School of Law, where he was a Hauser Global Scholar. Prior to joining the University of Minnesota, he has been a Visiting Researcher at Yale Law School and a Research Scholar at the Center for Research in Crime and Justice at NYU. Alessandro’s research interests include sentencing policies and practices, comparative criminal justice, sociology of punishment, criminal law theory, and the impact of neuroscience on the administration of criminal law.
Email: acorda@umn.edu or alessandro.corda@nyu.edu

Miltonette Craig is a Ph.D. student at Florida State University in the College of Criminology and Criminal Justice, and a recipient of the Florida Education Fund’s McKnight Doctoral Fellowship. Her research interests include gender and crime, race and crime, prisoner reentry, the victim-offender overlap, and policing. Her current research and teaching focuses on imprisonment conditions and drug legislation, respectively. She is also a volunteer instructor at FCI Tallahassee, a federal women’s prison. She has a J.D. from Georgia State University College of Law, an M.S. in Criminal Justice from Florida International University, and a B.A. in Psychology and Spanish from Spelman College.
Email: moc13b@my.fsu.edu

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Alessandro De Giorgi is an associate professor of Justice Studies at San Jose State University. Before joining the Department of Justice Studies at SJSU in 2007 his teaching and research interests include theories of punishment and social control, urban ethnography, political economy, and social justice. Currently, he is conducting an ethnographic research on the socioeconomic consequences of concentrated incarceration and prisoner reentry in a disadvantaged neighborhood of Oakland, CA.  Select Publications: De Giorgi, A. (2013). “Prisons and political economy in late capitalist societies.” In D. Scott (ed.) Why Prison? Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press; De Giorgi, A. (2012). Punishment and political economy. In J. Simon & R. Sparks (eds.) Handbook of Punishment and Society. London: Sage; De Giorgi, A. (2010). “Immigration control, post-Fordism, and less eligibility. A materialist critique of the criminalization of immigrants across Europe”. Punishment & Society, 12, 2: 147-167; De Giorgi, A. (2006). Re-thinking the Political Economy of Punishment: Perspectives on post-Fordism and Penal Politics. Aldershot: Ashgate, UK., De Giorgi, A. (2006). El gobierno de la excedencia. Postfordismo y control de la multitud. Madrid: Traficantes de Sueños. (Spanish); De Giorgi, A. (2005). Tolerancia Cero. Estrategias y pràcticas de la sociedad de control. Barcelona: Virus Editorial. (Spanish).
Email: alessandro.degiorgi@sjsu.edu

Corentin Durand is a PhD Candidate and Temporay Lecturer in Sociology at the School for Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences (Paris, France). His work focuses on grievance mechanisms and power relations in contemporary French prisons. Drawing mostly from ethnographies in two prisons, the project examines the content, functioning and transformation of various forms of communications between prisoners and authorities, where grievances can be voiced as long as they agree with certain material, formal and rhetorical standards. A major concern of the dissertation is to ethnographically described the transformations of prison governementality and resistance, as induced by the combined influence of administrative reforms, unprecedented normative activity from national and international courts and growing involvement of social movements. Corentin has published several journal articles, so far mostly in French, on the use of law by prisoners, the European monitoring of correctionnal policies, Foucault's discussion of power, and the constraints and opportunity faced by the public sociology of prisons. He has also been involved in several projects with prison-law practitioners, as the European Prison Litigation Network, funded by the European Commission.
Email : corentin.durand@ens.fr
Webpages : http://cems.ehess.fr/index.php?3749


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Benjamin Fleury-Steiner is a professor of sociology and criminal justice at the University of Delaware.  His research explores individual narratives and official and media discourse of punishment and rights in the context of broader institutional inequalities and sociopolitical conditions.  He is the author of four books:  The Pains of Mass Imprisonment with Jamie G. Longazel (Routledge, 2013); Disposable Heroes: The Betrayal of African American Veterans (Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2012); Dying Inside: The HIV/AIDS Ward at Limestone Prison (University of Michigan Press, 2008); Jurors' Stories of Death: How America's Death Penalty Invests in Inequality (University of Michigan Press, 2004); and co-editor of The New Civil Rights Research:  A Constitutive Approach (A Choice Outstanding Academic Book Title for 2006)
Email: bfs@udel.edu

David Garland is Arthur T. Vanderbilt Professor of Law and Professor of Sociology at New York University and a Professorial Fellow at Edinburgh University School of Law (where he taught from 1979 until 1992). Garland was the founding editor of the journal Punishment & Society and he is the author of a series of books on punishment and social control – Punishment and Welfare: A History of Penal Strategies (1985), Punishment and Modern Society: A Study in Social Theory (1990); The Culture of Control: Crime and Social Order in Contemporary Society (2001) and Peculiar Institution: America's Death Penalty in an Age of Abolition (2010). He has also written on such topics as the history of criminological thought, postmodernism, governmentality, risk, moral panics, the concept of culture, and the welfare state. His most recent book is The Welfare State: A Very Short Introduction (OUP: March 2016). 
Email: david.garland@nyu.edu
Websites: http://sociology.fas.nyu.edu/object/davidgarland
https://its.law.nyu.edu/facultyprofiles/profile.cfm?personID=19938

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Nazgol Ghandnoosh is a Research Analyst at The Sentencing Project, where she develops and synthesizes research to inform policy. She is interested in measures and perceptions of crime rates, causes of prolonged sentencing and racial disparities in punishment, and reform efforts. Her current project investigates the relationship between racial associations of crime and punitive policy preferences. Her dissertation examined resistance to mass incarceration through an in-depth study of a South Los Angeles group advocating for the parole release of term-to-life prisoners. Her work has been published or referenced in outlets including the Washington Post and Huffington Post, and academic journals including Ethnic and Racial Studies. She edits The Sentencing Project’s Race and Justice Newsletter. Nazgol holds a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of California, Los Angeles.
Email: nghandnoosh@sentencingproject.org

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Phil Goodman is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto. His primary research interests include punishment, prisons, rehabilitation, race & ethnicity, and penal labour. Previous projects include a study of California’s prison fire camps to better understand the variegated nature of punishment, with articles that pay particular attention to rehabilitation (Social Problems), work (special issue of Working USA), and race (American Journal of Sociology). His on-going research examines persistent offenders (with Candace Kruttschnitt), the penal drama surrounding the closure of Canada’s prison farms (with Meghan Dawe, and with an article forthcoming in the British Journal of Criminology), and how ex-prisoners navigate re-entry (with particular attention to employment and masculinity). He has also completed a book manuscript with Joshua Page and Michelle Phelps titled Breaking the Pendulum: The Long Struggle Over Criminal Justice (under contract with Oxford University Press).
Email: p.goodman@utoronto.ca



Kelly Hannah-Moffat is a full professor of Sociology/Criminology and Vice Dean undergraduate at University of Toronto Mississauga and the Director of the Centre of Criminology & Sociolegal Studies. She conducts interdisciplinary research on risk, human rights, gendered justice, punishment and marginalized and diverse populations.  Her work on risk, gender and punishment focuses on how variables such as gender and race interact with seemingly objective risk assessment tools, the experiences of the assessors and the institutional operationalization of policy reforms.  Her recent work-studies specialized courts (domestic violence, Aboriginal, community/wellness and drug courts) and how legal practices such as bail, sentencing, and case processing have collectively changed as a consequence of the hybrid approaches used in various specialized courts.
Hannah-Moffat, K.  (2015) ‘The Uncertainties of Risk Assessment: Partiality, Transparency and Just Decisions’, Federal Sentencing Reporter; (2015) ‘Needle in a haystack: Logical parameters of treatment based on actuarial risk - needs assessments’ Criminology and Public Policy; (2012) ‘Actuarial Sentencing: An Unsettled proposition’ Justice Quarterly; (2010) “Sacrosanct or flawed: Risk, Accountability and Gender-responsive Penal Politics” Current Issues in Criminal Justice. 22 (2): 193-216;  with Justice D. Cole (2007) Sentencing and Risk – Special issue of the Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice 49 (4).with P. Maurutto (2012) ‘Shifting and targeted forms of penal governance: Bail, punishment, and specialized courts’ Theoretical Criminology; (2007) ‘Understanding risk in the Context of the Youth Criminal Justice Act.’  Canadian Journal of Criminology. 49 (4):465-491. (2005) ‘Assembling risk and the restructuring of penal control’.   British Journal of Criminology. 45: 1-17;  and (2007) edited with P. O’Malley Gendered Risks, Routledge.
Email: hannah.moffat@utoronto.ca

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Erin Hatton an assistant professor of sociology at the State University of New York at Buffalo. Her research focuses on work and political economy, while also extending into the fields of social inequality, law, criminology, and social policy. Her first book, The Temp Economy: From Kelly Girls to Permatemps in Postwar America, examines the temporary help industry and the rise of the new economy. Her second book project, tentatively titled Between Work and Slavery: Workers at the Margins of the Law, examines three groups of workers who labor without the full protection of employment and labor laws: prisoners, welfare recipients, and domestic workers.
Email: eehatton@buffalo.edu


Adelina Iftene, LL.B, LL.M, PhD is currently a SSHRC Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Osgoode Hall Faculty of Law of York University, Canada. Her main research and teaching interests are criminal law and procedure, prison law and prisoners’ rights, sentencing, evidence, and human rights. She has completed her PhD in law at Queen’s University, Canada, specializing in criminal and prison law. Her dissertation - funded by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) through an Armand Bombardier Doctoral Scholarship - used social science methodology to answer legal questions regarding the imprisonment of older male prisoners in Canadian federal corrections. For the purpose of this project she carried out 197 interviews in 7 penitentiaries with the purpose of reviewing the senior prisoners’ perspective on their health status and access to medical care, victimization and discipline, programming and relationships. Her main current research project is an investigation into the aging of female prisoners, their needs, the treatment they receive behind bars and the legal actions that could help enforce their rights. Her work lies at the intersection of law, policy, and social science. She uses empirical social science and feminist methodology to collect data that would support the articulation of policy claims and legal challenges of the current status-quo. The findings of the two studies together will become part of the same monograph on life and rights of senior prisoners in Canadian penitentiaries.

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Josh Kaiser is a Law and Social Science Fellow at the American Bar Foundation and a JD-PhD candidate in law and sociology at Northwestern University. His research focuses on state control and state violence across nations through mixed methodologies and a critical, sociological lens. His dissertation (chaired by John Hagan and advised by Laura Beth Nielsen, Bob Nelson, Heather Schoenfeld, and Jonathan Simon) compares the rise of mass incarceration in the late twentieth-century United States to the earlier but less visible rise of “hidden sentences,” meaning all legally imposed punishments inflicted upon criminalized people beyond their formally recognized, judge-issued sentences. Kaiser is the author of “Revealing the Hidden Sentence” and two other forthcoming articles on hidden sentences, of “Gendered Genocide” and two other articles that illuminate the social, multidimensional process of genocide, and of Iraq and the Crimes of Aggressive War and four articles on the sectarian displacement, criminal entrepreneurship, and legal cynicism caused by the 2003 invasion and occupation of Iraq.
Email: joshauwa@northwestern.edu

Nicole Kaufman is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Ohio University, where she is also an affiliate of the Center for Law, Justice and Culture. Kaufman received her PhD in Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2014. She is interested in the ways that formerly incarcerated people--especially women--are incorporated into American society through the work of non-state organizations and policies that encourage the privatization of post-release services. She is also interested in understanding the church/state boundary in the regulation of treatment programs for people with criminal records, especially at faith-based settings. 
Email: kaufmann@ohio.edu

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Paul Kaplan is Associate Professor of Criminal Justice in the School of Public Affairs at San Diego State University, and the President of the Western Society of Criminology (2013-20140.  He received his PhD in Criminology, Law and Society from the University of California, Irvine in 2007. Prior to entering academics, Paul worked as a mitigation investigator on capital cases.  His primary research area is capital punishment, but he also works on projects involving sociolegal theory, cultural criminology, and comparative law. His work has appeared in journals such as the Law & Society ReviewTheoretical Criminology, and Law & Social Inquiry. His first book, Murder Stories: Ideological Narratives in Capital Punishment was published in 2012.  Paul loves underground metal, cats and dogs, craft beer, and basketball.
Email: pkaplan@mail.sdsu.edu 



Erin M. Kerrison is an Assistant Professor in the School of Social Welfare at the University of California, Berkeley. Kerrison’s work extends from a legal epidemiological framework, wherein law and legal institutions operate as social determinants of health. Specifically, through varied agency partnerships, her mixed-method research agenda investigates the impact that compounded structural inequality, concentrated poverty, and state supervision has on service delivery, substance abuse, violence, and other health outcomes for individuals and communities marked by criminal justice intervention. Kerrison’s recent empirical research has been published in Criminal Justice and Behavior, Women and Criminal Justice, the Journal of Developmental and Life Course Criminology, and the Harvard Journal on Racial and Ethnic Justice. Her current book project, “Hustles and Hurdles: Law’s Impact on Desistance for Job-Seeking Former Prisoners,” foregrounds life history narratives for a sample of 300 drug-involved former prisoners, to demonstrate how law, labor markets, neighborhoods, criminal justice surveillance, and substance abuse patterns are compounded and steer long-term desistance and health outcomes.
Email: kerrison@berkeley.edu

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Ross Kleinstuber is an Assistant Professor of Sociology and Criminology at the University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown (USA).  His teaching interests include sociology of law, criminology, criminal court procedure, deviance & social control, and contemporary issues in criminal justice.  His research focuses on capital punishment; law & society (sociology of law); and genocide, crimes against humanity, & international law.  He recent and forthcoming publications include “We’re All Born With Equal Opportunities”: Hegemonic Individualism and Contextual Mitigation Among Delaware Capital JurorsJournal of Qualitative Criminal Justice & Criminology  1 (1); “‘Only A Recommendation’: How Delaware Capital Sentencing Law Subverts Meaningful Deliberations and Jurors’ Feelings of Responsibility,” Widener Law Review 19 (2); “Mitigation vs. Individualism:  Examining Judges’ Capital Sentencing Decisions,” forthcoming in Studies in Law, Politics, and Society; and “Genocide: Social and Economic Aspects of,” forthcoming book chapter in International Encyclopedia of Social and Behavioral Sciences, 2nd ed.  He is also currently working on a book on the Delaware death penalty that examines the role of individualism in the presentation of mitigating evidence by defense attorneys, in the receptivity to mitigating evidence by judges and jurors, and in the decision making of judges and jurors.  In addition, he is in the process of completing a chapter on the findings of Capital Jury Project research with William Bowers, Marla Sandys, and Elizabeth Vartkessian for America’s Experiment with Capital Punishment, 3rd ed. and a chapter on the implications of the McCleskey decision for understanding race in America for America After McCleskey.
Email: rkleins@pitt.edu

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Aaron Kupchik is professor of sociology and criminal justice at the University of Delaware. His research focuses on the punishment of youth in schools, courts, and correctional facilities. He is author of Homeroom Security: School discipline in an age of fear, and Judging Juveniles: Prosecuting adolescents in adult and juvenile courts (winner of the 2007 American Society of Criminology Hindelang Book Award). His current work considers how excessive and exclusionary school punishment can impact children’s lives into their adulthood, and also affect the fortunes of their families.
Email: akupchik@udel.edu

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Sarah Lageson is an Assistant Professor at Rutgers School of Criminal Justice. She studies how technology changes laws, the criminal justice system, and forms of punishment. Her research examines "digital punishment" and the documentation of justice system contact on the internet. She also hosts "Give Methods a Chance," a podcast devoted to research methods. Her work has been published in Criminology, Law and Social Inquiry, the British Journal of Sociology, Sociological Methods and Research, Contexts, and online at The Society Pages. 

Email: sarah.lageson@rutgers.edu
Website: www.sarahlageson.com

Ayobami Laniyonu is a PhD candidate in the department of Political Science and a Master’s degree student in Statistics at the University of California, Los Angeles, and is currently a National Science Foundation & Law and Society Association Dissertation Fellow at the American Bar Foundation in Chicago, Illinois (Fall 2016 – Spring 2018). Ayo's research interests center around state practices of social control, political behavior, and municipal politics. His current research explores the impact that policing practices have on political participation and attempts to reconcile apparently contradictory evidence that suggests, on the one hand, that intense and punitive police-citizen contact reduces the likelihood of citizens to engage in politics, but recognizes, on the other hand, that instances of police violence and abuse can motivate significant levels of political mobilization and protest. Other projects, such as work published by Urban Affairs Review, explores the impact that gentrification, urban inequality, and race have on punitive and racialized policing practices.
Email: alaniyonu@gmail.com
Website: ayolaniyonu.com

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Amy E. Lerman is a political scientist who joined the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley in 2013. She writes on issues related to public opinion, political participation, social inequality, and criminal justice. She is the author of The Modern Prison Paradox: Politics, Punishment, and Social Community (Cambridge University Press 2013) and the forthcoming bookArresting Citizenship: The Democratic Consequences of American Crime Control (with Vesla Weaver, The University of Chicago Press 2014). In addition to research and teaching, she has been affiliated with the Prison University Project college program at San Quentin State Prison since 2002.
Email: alerman@berkeley.edu


Ian Loader is Professor of Criminology at the University of Oxford and Professorial Fellow of All Souls College. Ian is the author of six books, the most recent of which Public Criminology? was published by Routledge in 2010 (with Richard Sparks) and has recently been translated into Mandarin. He has also edited six volumes, including Justice and Penal Reform (with Barry Goldson, Steve Farrall and Anita Dockley, Routledge, 2016), Democratic Theory and Mass Incarceration (with Albert Dzur and Richard Sparks, Oxford UP, September 2016 ) and The SAGE Handbook of Global Policing (with Ben Bradford, Bea Jauregui and Jonny Steinberg) which is due to appear in July 2016. Ian has also published theoretical and empirical papers on policing, private security, public sensibilities towards crime, penal policy and culture, the politics of crime control, and the public roles of criminology. Ian is currently working on a project – termed A Better Politics of Crime - concerned with different dimensions of the relationship between crime control and democratic politics. The first strand of work on this project was brought together in Public Criminology?The next key stage will be a monograph with the working title of Ideologies and Crime Control which is in the early stages of preparation. He also continues to write on policing and private security. Ian is Editor-in-Chief of the Howard Journal of Crime and Justice. He has previously served on the Editorial boards of the British Journal of Criminology and Theoretical Criminology.
Email: Ian.loader@crim.ox.ac.uk
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Jamie Longazel is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work at the University of Dayton. His research focuses on the intersecting issues of immigration law and politics, crime and inequality, and race relations.  He is the co-author of the book The Pains of Mass Imprisonment (with Benjamin Fleury-Steiner; Routledge, 2013) and has recent publications dealing with issues of punishment and social control appearing in Theoretical Criminology, Punishment & Society, Sociology Compass, Chicana/o Latina/o Law Review, and Race & Justice.
Email: jlongazel1@udayton.edu 


Mona Lynch is Professor and Chancellor’s Fellow in Criminology, Law and Society and, by courtesy, the School of Law at the University of California, Irvine. Trained as a social psychologist, her research focuses on criminal sentencing and punishment, and on institutionalized forms of bias within criminal justice settings. She is current editor, with Kelly Hannah-Moffat, of the journal Punishment & Society. Her research has been published in a wide range of journals, law reviews, and edited volumes including American Journal of Criminal Law, British Journal of Criminology, Criminology and Public Policy; Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology; Law and Human Behavior; Law & Social Inquiry; Law and Society Review; Law and Policy Review; Punishment and Society; Miami Law Review; Michigan State Law Review; Studies in Law, Politics, and Society; and Theoretical Criminology. She is also the author of Sunbelt Justice: Arizona and the Transformation of American Punishment (2009), published with Stanford University Press.
Email: lynchm@uci.edu 

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Dario Melossi is Full Professor of Criminology in the School of Law of the University of Bologna. After having being conferred a law degree at this University, he went on to do a Ph. D. in sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He was then Assistant and thereafter Associate Professor at the University of California, Davis, from 1986 to 1993. He has published  The Prison and the Factory (1977, together with Massimo Pavarini), The State of Social Control: A Sociological Study of Concepts of State and Social Control in the Making of Democracy (1990), and Controlling Crime, Controlling Society: Thinking About Crime in Europe and America (2008), plus about 200 other edited books, chapters, and articles. He is Editor of  Studi sulla questione criminale and Editor-in-Chief of Punishment and Society, and is member of the Board of many other professional journals. His current research concerns the process of construction of deviance and social control within the European Union, especially with regard to migration processes.
Email: dario.melossi@unibo.it

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Joshua Page is an associate professor of sociology at the University of Minnesota and a faculty affiliate at the Robina Institute of Criminal Law and Criminal Justice. His research, teaching, and public engagement focus on criminal punishment, though he’s also interested in politics, labor unions, sports, and an assortment of other topics. He’s the author of The Toughest Beat: Politics, Punishment, and the Prison Officers Union in California (OUP, 2011), and he’s currently writing a book with Michelle Phelps and Phil Goodman titled Breaking the Pendulum: The Long Struggle Over Criminal Justice.
Email: page@umn.edu

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Debra Parkes is Associate Dean (Research and Graduate Studies) in the Faculty of Law, University of Manitoba. Her research focuses on punishment policy and incarceration in the Canadian context, with a focus on resistance to oversight and accountability in carceral contexts. She is in the process of completing a multi-year research project funded by the Social Sciences & Humanities Research Council of Canada, Prisoners’ Rights in Punitive Times: Investigating Prison Complaint and Inspection Systems. She was Editor-in-Chief of the Canadian Journal of Women and the Law from 2009-2013 and President of the Canadian Law & Society Association from 2007-2010. 
Email: Debra.Parkes@umanitoba.ca
Access papers here: http://ssrn.com/author=345996

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Natalie Pifer is a doctoral student in the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at the University of California, Irvine. Her research focuses on extreme punishments and conditions of confinement, policing the mentally ill, and legal consciousness of criminal law. You can view recent publications and learn more about her work at: https://socialecology.uci.edu/students/grad/npifer

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Michelle S Phelps is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Minnesota (Twin Cities). Her work focuses on the punitive turn in the U.S., with a special focus on prisons and probation supervision. Michelle is currently working on several articles that examine the rise of "mass probation" and its import for the sociology of punishment and a book project (joint with Joshua Page and Philip Goodman) tentatively titled Breaking the Pendulum: The Long Struggle Over Criminal Justice. Her previous work has been published in Law & Society ReviewLaw & Policy, and the Journal of Criminal Justice. She teaches courses on the sociology of crime and punishment. Michelle holds a B.A. in Psychology from UC Berkeley and a M.A. and Ph.D. in Sociology from Princeton University. You can learn more at: www.umn.edu/~phelps
Email: phelps@umn.edu

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Gary Potter is a professor in the School of Justice Studies at Eastern Kentucky University. He has authored eight books, including Drugs in Society, Criminal Organizations, Organized Crime, Controversies in White Collar Crime, Constructing Crime, and The Mythology of Crime and Criminal Justice. He has also been published in several journals, including Crime, Law and Social Change, the Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice, Criminal Justice Policy Review, Journal of Criminal Justice and Corruption and Reform. He  is currently doing research on the social construction of crime, criminal justice policy, drug trafficking and money laundering.
Email: Gary.Potter@eku.edu

Marianne Quirouette is a PhD candidate in Sociology at the University of Toronto who has studied and published in three related areas: (1) police reports and police records, (2) the governance of ‘complex risk/needs' in criminal courts and in the community and (3) the experience of people who are homeless and dealing with criminalization. Funded by SSHRC and the Baxter & Alma Ricard Foundation, her dissertation research examines problem-solving strategies and coordination between community service providers, institutions and the criminal justice system. Pulling from 105 stakeholder interviews and 2+ years of fieldwork, the work focuses on the governance of multiply disadvantaged people in conflict with the law – for example, people who face complex issues related to poverty, discrimination, homelessness, addiction, mental health and dementia. Her next research project explores how criminal defense lawyers make sense of their practice with clients facing complex issues and multiple disadvantages. These actors play an important part in the processes that govern pre-trial interventions, yet little research considers how they work with marginalized clients, acting as representatives and advocates for their rights. Her research and teaching interests include law and marginal groups; policing; sociology of punishment; homelessness; criminal courts; qualitative methods; community corrections; and interdisciplinary/inter-agency work. For more details on publications, research and teaching experience, visit LinkedIn or Academia
Email: marianne.quirouette@mail.utoronto.ca


PictureKeramet Reiter is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminology, Law & Society and at the School of Law at the University of California, Irvine. Her research focuses on prisons, prisoners’ rights, and the impact of prison and punishment policy on individuals, communities, and legal systems. Her book on the history and uses of U.S. supermax prisons, 23/7: Pelican Bay Prison and the Rise of Long-Term Solitary Confinement, will be released by Yale University Press in October 2016. Recent publications include the anthology Extreme Punishmentco-edited with Alexa Koenig; "Reclaiming the Power to Punish" in Law & Society Review in 2016, and “Parole, Snitch, or Die: California’s Supermax Prisons and Prisoners, 1987-2007” in Punishment and Society in 2012.
E-mail: reiterk@uci.edu

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Ashley Rubin is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto. One trajectory of her research explores the character, causes, and consequences of prisoners' secondary adjustments to prison and their relationship to political resistance. Another trajectory examines prisons as organizations, which requires taking seriously the managerial influences on prisons as distinct from prisons' penal components. Much of her recent work mobilizes neo-institutional theory to understand the dynamics of widespread penal change and to better understand the significance of penal innovations.  Some of her recent publications include, "A Neo-Institutional Account of Prison Diffusion" (Law and Society Review, 2015), winner of the Law and Society Article Prize (2016), and "Resistance or Friction: Understanding the Significance of Prisoners' Secondary Adjustments" (Theoretical Criminology, 2015).
Email: ashley.rubin@utoronto.ca 


Danielle S. Rudes is an Associate Professor of Criminology, Law and Society and the Deputy Director of the Center for Advancing Correctional Excellence (ACE!) at George Mason University. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Irvine. Dr. Rudes is a qualitative researcher whose methods include ethnographic observation, interviews, and focus groups with over 15 years of experience working with corrections agencies at the federal, state and local county levels including prisons, jails, probation/parole agencies and problem-solving courts. Here reserach largely examines how social control organizations and their middle management and street-level workers understand, negotiate, and at times, resist change. Dr. Rudes experience includes working with community corrections agencies during adoption, adaptation and implementation of various workplace practices and reforms including: contingency management (incentives/rewards/sanctions), risk-needs assessment instruments and motivational interviewing. Dr. Rudes serves as Associate Editor of the journal Victims & Offenders and publishes regularly in journals such as Criminal Justice & Behavior, Federal Probation, Law & Policy and Justice Quarterly. Her work is funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Institute of Justice. Dr. Rudes is also the 2012 winner of the Teaching Excellence Award and the 2015 Mentoring Excellence Award at George Mason University.

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Joachim J. Savelsberg is a professor of sociology and law and the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Chair at the University of Minnesota. He teaches courses in the sociology of law and human rights, crime and punishment, sociological theory, and sociology of knowledge. Recent work on human rights crimes and responses to them include: Representing Mass Violence: Conflicting Responses to Human Rights Violations in Darfur. Oakland, CA: University of California Press, 2015; ““Global Justice, National Distinctions: Criminalizing Human Rights Violations in Darfur”” (with Hollie Nyseth Brehm). American Journal of Sociology 121(2015)2; American Memories: Atrocities and the Law (with Ryan D. King). New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 2011; and Crime and Human Rights: Criminology of Genocide and Atrocities. London: Sage, 2010. Publications on punishment, social control, and the role of criminology include: “Law and Collective Memory” (with Ryan D. King) Annual Review of Law and Social Science 3 (2007):189-211; “Institutionalizing Collective Memories of Hate: Law and Law Enforcement in Germany and the United States” (with Ryan D. King) American Journal of Sociology 111 (2005):579-616;  “Period and Cohort Effects in the Production of Scholarly Knowledge: The Case of Criminology, 1951-1993" (with Sarah M. Flood) Criminology 42 (2004):1009-1041. “Knowledge, Domination, and Criminal Punishment Revisited: Incorporating State Socialism.”  Punishment and Society 1(1999):45-70; "Knowledge, Domination, and Criminal Punishment." American Journal of Sociology 99(1994):911-943; "Law That Does Not Fit Society: Sentencing Guidelines as a Neo-Classical Reaction to the Dilemmas of Substantivized Law." American Journal of Sociology 97(1992):1346-81.

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Lori Sexton is an Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice and Criminology at the University of Missouri, Kansas City.  She has a Ph.D. in Criminology, Law and Society from the University of California, Irvine and an M.A. in Criminology from the University of Pennsylvania.  Lori’s interests lie at the intersection of criminology and sociolegal studies, with a specific focus on prisons, punishment and the lived experience of penal sanctions.  Lori is currently working on a study of the ways in which prisoners experience and make meaning of their punishment (their “penal consciousness”), a project examining the experiences and culture of transgender prisoners, and an implementation evaluation of a community corrections anti-violence initiative in Kansas City.  Lori’s work has been funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Institute of Justice, and has been published in Justice Quarterly and Criminology & Public Policy.
Email: sextonl@umkc.edu 

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Forrest Stuart is an Assistant Professor in Sociology and the College at the University of Chicago. His research investigates how policing impacts daily life in impoverished communities of color. His work has been published in Law and Social InquiryUrban StudiesSouls, and The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. He is currently working on a book, titled Policing Rock Bottom, which is an ethnographic examination of the implementation and experience of broken windows policing in Los Angeles’ Skid Row district. He teaches courses on urban sociology, crime, ethnography, and theory.
Email: forreststuart@uchicago.edu

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Gail Super is a postdoctoral researcher at the Centre for Criminology, University of Cape Town, South Africa.  Her research focuses on Punishment and Democracy; Crime and Punishment in South Africa; Punishment and vigilantism; Neoliberalisation and Crime Control; the Politics of Punishment; Prisons.  Forthcoming and Recent publications include:  Governing through Crime in South Africa: The politics of punishment and race in neo-liberalizing regimes, Ashgate, Advances in Criminology series: Surrey.   ‘Punishment and the body in the 'old' and 'new' South Africa, a story of punitive humanism’, Theoretical Criminology, 15 (4): 427-  443.  ‘Like Some Rough Beast Slouching Towards Bethlehem to be Born: A historical perspective on the institution of the prison in South Africa, 1976-2004’, British Journal of Criminology, January, 51(1): 201-221.  The Spectacle of Crime in the “New” South  Africa: A Historical Perspective (1976-2004)’, British Journal of Criminology, March, 50(2): 165-184.  ‘Prison Labour in Namibia’, in Dunkel, F & Van Zyl Smit, D (eds), Prison Labour – Salvation or Slavery?: International Perspectives, International Series on Law and Society. Aldershot (UK), Brookfield (USA), Singapore and Sydney: Ashgate.
Email: gjs220@nyu.edu 


Alex Tepperman is a PhD candidate in the Department of History at the University of Florida. His work focuses on twentieth century penal history – particularly the loosely-defined “First Era of Mass Imprisonment” (1919-1940) – and the social and cultural pre-history of the modern Prisoners’ Rights Movement. He has also worked extensively on broader issues of deviance and social control, co-authoring the 3rd edition of Deviance, Crime, and Control: Beyond the Straight and Narrow (Oxford University, 2013) and contributing to the forthcoming edited volume Carceral Mobilities (Routledge, 2016), in addition to serving as the Editor-in-Chief of Points: The Blog of the Alcohol and Drugs History Society. He holds Master’s Degrees in Criminology & Sociolegal Studies from the University of Toronto and History from the University of Rochester. 
E-mail: atepperm@ufl.edu



Sarah Turnbull is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow with the Centre for Criminology at the University of Oxford. Her current research examines immigration detention and deportation in the United Kingdom, with specific focus on the experiences of confinement and removal in relation to affective issues of home, belonging, and identity in postcolonial, multicultural Britain. Sarah has published articles on punishment in Canada in Punishment & Society, British Journal of Criminology, and Canadian Journal of Law & Society. Her forthcoming book, Parole in Canada: Gender and Diversity in the Federal System (UBC Press, 2016), based on her doctoral research, explores the integration of ‘gender’ and ‘diversity’ into Canadian federal parole policy and practice, with a specific focus on how ideas about ‘difference’ shape penal responses for particular groups of offenders. Sarah is Associate Director and co-editor of Border Criminologies (http://bordercriminologies.law.ox.ac.uk/), a research network focused broadly on border control.
Email: sarah.turnbull@crim.ox.ac.uk

Anjuli Verma received a Ph.D. in Criminology, Law and Society at the University of California, Irvine. She is the 2016-17 Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of California, Berkeley in the department of Jurisprudence and Social Policy. Her research and teaching interests include: social reactions to crime and deviance; law and organizations; legal mobilization and social movements; and mixed-methods research. Anjuli’s doctoral research examines the causes and effects of deinstitutionalization and decarceration in California, with a focus on legal reform and organizational regulation and compliance processes. During her postdoctoral fellowship, she will launch a new project that examines the “afterlife” of mass incarceration and how prison displacements affect various dimensions of community health, including among elderly parolees. Anjuli was awarded the National Science Foundation Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grant and the National Institute of Justice Graduate Research Fellowship, and her work has been published in Law & Society Review, The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, The Oxford Handbook on Prisons and Imprisonment and The American Journal of Bioethics. Her co-authored work is forthcoming in Ethnography. She is a member of the University of California Criminal Justice & Health Consortium and serves on the advisory board for the non-profit research organization, Justice Strategies. Before graduate school, Anjuli worked as a policy advocate and communications strategist on drug policy and criminal justice reform issues at the American Civil Liberties Union. She earned a B.A. in Political and Social Thought from the University of Virginia and held internships at the Southern Poverty Law Center in Montgomery, Alabama and the National Indian Human Rights Commission in New Delhi. To learn more about Anjuli’s research and teaching, visit: http://sites.uci.edu/anjuliverma/
Email: acverma@berkeley.edu 

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Robert Werth is a Lecturer in the Department of Sociology at Rice University. Broadly, his research focuses on punishment, risk/danger, and the ways in which penal subjects are constituted, imagined and represented. His current research explores (a) how individuals on parole experience and navigate state efforts to regulate conduct and personhood and (b) how parole personnel enact parole, including how they understand and engage with the formal goals of community safety, rehabilitation, and reintegration. This project also explores how paroled subjects are assessed, including the ways in which evaluation assembles technical, moral and affective knowledges. His work has appeared in journals such as Punishment & Society, Theoretical Criminology, and the British Journal of Criminology.
Email: rwerth@rice.edu



Stephen Wulff is a doctoral student in the Department of Sociology at the University of Minnesota. His research interests include social movements, punishment, policing, critical race theory, and qualitative research methods. His research has appeared in the Oxford Handbook of Social Movements and the International Journal of Criminology & Sociology. His dissertation draws on ethnographic, interview, and archival data to map the Twin Cities policing field and the competing stakeholders that comprise it (e.g., grassroots groups, police federation, police departments, civilian review boards, city officials). The multi-sited ethnography investigates how grassroots groups seek to hold police accountable in the post-Ferguson Black Lives Matter police reform era, while also shedding light on the novel police accountability mechanism of private insurance.
Email: wulff039@umn.edu



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Marjorie S. Zatz is professor of justice and social inquiry in Arizona State University's School of Social Transformation. She is on leave from her university for two years, serving as director of the Law and Social Sciences program at the National Science Foundation.  Her research addresses the ways in which race, ethnicity, and gender impact juvenile and criminal court processing and sanctioning, immigration policy, Chicano/a gangs, and comparative justice, particularly Latin American legal systems.  She is the author of Producing Legality: Law and Socialism in Cuba (Routledge, 1994) and co-editor of Law and the Quest for Justice (Quid Pro Law, 2013), Punishing Immigrants: Policy, Politics, and Injustice (New York University Press, 2012), Images of Color, Images of Crime (third edition Oxford University Press, 2006; first edition 1998, second edition 2002, Roxbury Publishing Company), and Making Law: The State, the Law, and Structural Contradictions (Indiana University Press, 1993). 
Email:  marjorie.zatz@asu.edu

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